In Black and White: Newspapers

A vast archive of the Ypsilanti newspaper articles  from 1865-1920 concerning the city’s African American community is hosted on this site. In the Newspaper Archive menu tabs you will find a large selection of references and some stories from the local, white-owned, press concerning the Ypsilanti black community from the Civil War until around 1920. Many of the families living on South Adams in 1900 are mentioned, as are the A.M.E. and Baptist Churches, the Good Samaritan Hall. In addition to the buildings and families of South Adams, the archives contains references to hundreds of other African-American Ypsilanti families.

The black-owned and edited Detroit Plaindealer contained a weekly column on Ypsilanti events ad contains a gift of information on the social life of the community. Over 150 such columns can be found on the Detroit Plaindealer subpage. For articles related to Emancipation Day celebrations, see the Emancipation Day page.  See the Second Baptist Newspaper Archive, Brown AME newspaper archive. Passing On contains hundreds of obituaries and death notices, articles on Fires and Accidents in the city, dozens of clippings on the rich Social Life, Clubs and Music of the community, articles on decades of varied Political Activity of the community including the texts of speeches given in Ypsilanti by the likes of Booker T. Washington, William Trotter Monroe, Sojourner Truth and Frederick Douglass, an archive with, often unpleasant, but historically important articles on Racism and Segregation in Ypsilanti, an archive of Articles on Crime, Arrests and Court that should be read with caution. The City, Census, Building and Business archive contains articles on black busniesses and city improvements.

The language of these stories, taken directly from area newspapers, is sometimes derisive and racist. The Democratic Party papers being, by far, the worst offenders. Notice how the reporting in the white press is increasingly about perceived black criminality as the years progressed.

The Ann Arbor Press about Ypsilanti

A Timeline of Ypsilanti black life mentioned in the local press.

March 18 1875

S. H. Wells, the colored Juror from Ypsilanti, served for the first time in the Circuit Court on Tuesday last, in the case of Douglas, Mallory & Co. vs. Lyon. Mr. Wells makes a very intelligent Juror, and Ypsilanti may well be proud of him.

Ann Arbor Courier

June 15 1877

The African Methodist Church will hold a State Convention at the Church in Ypsilanti and continuing for two days.

Commercial

July 28 1877

Last Sunday afternoon was one of special interest to the A.M.E. Church Sunday School. Mr. Richmond opened the exercises with. The elder pupils recited pieces in an impressive manner, showing great improvement. Remarks were made by D. B. Greene, Rev. Hardy, C.R. Pattison, Rev. Hawkins, and the Pastor, Rev. Bundy, interspersed by singing led by Miss Wortley. Mr. Hawkins has been a Disciple of Christ for 50 years. Fifty years ago, he was a slave in Alexandria, Virginia, and had been whipped for reading the Bible.

Commercial

July 8 1877

The Ypsilanti Cornet Band (colored) led the Ypsilantians. The Band won laurels all day, July 4.

Commercial

August 2 1877

Samuel Williams of this City, who expects to enter the University this Fall, will be the first colored man to enter the Literary Department of that Institution. He accompanied Capt. Lang to our city of Ypsilanti after the War, and has won the esteem of our entire community by persistent and well directed effort to obtain an education

Lapeer Clarion

September 1 1877

A grand excursion by the A.M.E. Church to Saline last Thursday. A handsome sum was realized for the Pastor of the Church, Rev. Jason Bundy, who labored with great faithfulness. The Ypsilanti colored Cornet Band accompanied the excursion and on their return gave our citizens some fine music.

Commercial

May 25 1878

On Sunday morning last, six converts of the A.M.E. Church were baptized in the river below the lower dam at the southern limits of the City.

Commercial

April 1 1881

The Courier office returns thanks to the Union Cornet Band (colored) of Ypsilanti, Robt. M. Thompson, leader, for a fine serenade last Wednesday evening. The members of this organization are able to “speek ” some most excellent music, especially so, considering the brief time they have been organized. They came up Wednesday night to play for a dance at McMahon’s hall, for the benefit of Geo. Moss, who has had ill-luck this winter, in breaking his limb.

Ann Arbor Courier

April 30 1884

Upwards of fifty members of the 102d US. (Colored) Infantry met at the Court house on the 28th last and perfected arrangements for a reunion of said regiment here [Ann Arbor], on the 31st of July and August 1st. A committee, consisting of six members of this city, and five from Ypsilanti, were appointed for that purpose, to meet and report May 12th, when another meeting will be held. The following were chosen (is a committee of arrangements. H. Freeman, J. Freeman, Rey. J. K. Hart, Win. N. Johnson, J. H. Davis and Hon. E. B. Thompson, of this city, and John Bolls, John Anderson, Wm. Ambrose, W. Rodman and Moses Marks, of Ypsilanti. Also committees on speakers and reception were chosen. Ex-Gov. Blair, of this State and Mayor Harriman will be called upon to deliver addresses to the soldier, and Hon. Jas. E. O’Hara and Daniel Mills, of Detroit, to orate Aug. 1

Ann Arbor Courier

May 28 1884

The 50th anniversary of emancipation of slaves in the West Indies will be observed in the city, August 1, 1884. The reunion of the surviving members of the 102nd colored regiment, U. S. A., will also be held on the same date. A largely attended meeting of colored citizens was held last week in preparation for the reunion; V. A. Sweeney was chairman and W. T. Johnson, secretary. The exercises will be held in Relief Park. It is expected that Col. Henry L. Chipman, the regiments old commander, and Major Martin R. Delaney, of South Carolina, will make addresses. Hon. J. G. O’Hara, …..may also be in attendance. The committee is in correspondence with him. Officers and committees as follows were chosen at last week’s meeting. Another meeting will be held this evening for making further arrangements: President of the day- Wm Graves Vice-Presidents-R. A. De Hazen, of Ypsilanti John Davis of Lansing; R. Massenburg of Toledo, GF Johnson and Oliver Hall of Jackson and Stephen Jacobs….-Assistant Marshall John Bowles of Ypsilanti

Ann Arbor Courier

July 23 1884

For the purpose of defraying the indebtedness of the society, the ladies of the A. M. E. church will furnish refreshments the first day of August on the Relief Park grounds

Ann Arbor Courier

September 10 1884

As a load of colored people were on their way to Whitmore Like last Thursday, they passed the farm of Michael Braun, a few miles north of this place. As they drove by Mr. Braun was at the well pumping water, and they called him, and wanted him to bring them some. This he refused to do, saying if they desired any water, there was plenty of it and a cup to drink it out of. One of the party then jumped out of the wagon with the assertion that “you won’t bring us any water, eh?’ and picking up a stone assaulted Braun, who was then suffering; from a broken arm which he carried in a sling. Braun’s hired man coming to his rescue, a general melee ensued, in which both himself and his hired man were severely handled. The colored men were arrested and jailed, one of them, Wm. McCoy, on a charge of assault with intent to kill, and two others, Marshatt and Gay, on a charge of assault. Their examination will be before Justice Freuauff next Friday. The above version of the affair is the one in general circulation here.

Ann Arbor Courier

September 17 1884

The trial of the colored men from Ypsilanti, for asault upon Michael Braun, spoken of in our last issue, has been in progress the past week beforeJustice Freauff, at the court house, and called together quite a crowd of spectators. Three days were consumed in the trial, which resulted in the sentencing of John Gay to 90 days in the lonia house of correction, for assault, in default of $55 fine and costs. Geo. Albert Maschat was also given 90 days at the same institution, on a charge of assault and battery, in default of $65 fine and costs. The trial of Wm. McCoy, on a charge of assault with intent to kill, was adjourned until the 24th. Gay and Maschat were taken to their new abode yesterday.

Ann Arbor Courier

September 24 1884

Wm. McCoy, the Ypsilanti colored man connected with the Michael Braun fracas, md his examination this morning before Justice Freauff, and was bound over to the circuit court.

Ann Arbor Courier

Republican Election Notice: JOHN H. FOX. The second nominee for circuit court commissioner- lives in Ypsilanti – native of Ohio- Ohio men have a reputation of never failing to get an office – Fox will prove no exception in this instance- so we all hope- is a colored man of unusual brilliancy- born at Piqua, Ohio- March 25th, 1859- quarter of a century old- but has a 40-year old head, just the same. Carne to Washtenaw in ’64- to Ypsilanti- had a hankering’ for book knowledge – employed spare moments in studying- kept at it- entered law department in ’77- graduated in ’79- went back to Ypsilanti – been practicing ever since – for past three years has been assistant to Prosecuting Attorney Whitman- has not imbibed Whitman’s political views, however – but absorbed some of his own polish- conducted cases in court in a sharp, business-like manner- sends the best conveyances to the register’s office of any lawyer In the county- everything about them plain and distinct – is in every way I capable of making a good commissioner – will make a good commissioner – is going to poll more votes than his competitor. Is of spare build- one shade lighter than Cramer- 5’ ft. 11 in. tall- lighting weight 140 lbs.- a good man for the ticket- ought to receive every vote in the county

Ann Arbor Courier

January 21 1885

Last Friday was a bad day for Henry Mahaley, a colored man, whose home is in Ypsilanti, but who has been at work for Wm. H. Rice, a farmer living a few miles east of here, in Ann Arbor town, since last March. Mahaley started for Ann Arbor with a load of green wood, and while coming down what is known as “the Green hill,” on the Glazier road, the horses became unmanageable and started to run. Mahaley, who was walking by the side of the wagon, was jerked under the vehicle, and one of the wheels passed over his left leg, below the knee, crushing the bones the width of the tire, in such a manner that it is thought amputation is necessary. The team ran to Geo. Orcutt’s place before being caught, but escaped uninjured.

Ann Arbor Courier

December 9 1885

Deacon Evans, one of Ypsilanti’s oldest colored residents died recently, aged 70 years.

Ann Arbor Courier

June 9 1886

John H. Fox graduate of the law department, class of ’79, died at his home in Ypsilanti last Sunday night. Mr. Fox was a colored man of unusual attainments, and had secured for himself a lucrative practice as a lawyer, being in the office of Hon. Chas. R. Whitman. Mr. Fox was a candidate two years ago on the republican ticket for circuit court commissioner, but was snowed under in the general defeat of the republicans in this county. He was 27 years of age, and a man who commanded the respect of all who knew him.

Ann Arbor Courier

July 14 1886

Monday, August 2d, is the day upon which the colored people of Ypsilanti have decided to celebrate emancipation. Hon. H. P. Jacobs, of Natchez, Miss., and E. P. Allen are announced as among the speakers. It has been estimated that from 5,000 to 8,000 excursionists will be in that city at that time.

Ann Arbor Courier

November 17 1886

Ypsilanti now has a colored band – or band colored people, rather- 14 strong.

Ann Arbor Courier

July 6 1887

St. John’s Day, Friday last, was celebrated here by a parade of St. Andrew’s masonic lodge, colored, in the evening. The parade ended at Benevolent Hall, on Chicago Avenue, where addresses were delivered by Rev. Greenbury Polk of Ann Arbor, Rev. Max Smith and Rev. Mr. Saunders. The Ypsilanti colored band headed the procession.

Ann Arbor Courier

October 5 1887

Marriage: Allen Pierce, aged 63, colored, of Ypsilanti, and Jane Elizabeth Warren, aged 40 years, also colored, of Ypsilanti.

Ann Arbor Courier

October 12 1887

Married: Harvey Harrison, aged 25, (col.) and Anna Dow, 23, col., both of Ypsilanti.

Ann Arbor Courier

January 25 1888

The Michigan grand lodge of colored masons has been in session at Ypsilanti his week.

Ann Arbor Courier

January 27 1888

Eliza Johnson, born a slave, but for the past forty years a resident of Ypsilanti, died January 13, aged 86 years.

The members of the African masonic lodge of the state banqueted in Ypsilanti, Monday evening, although watermellons are not in season.

Ann Arbor Argus

March 28 1888

The People vs. Thomas Jones Theopholis Goodwin. Burglary from the store of John Galligher, Ypsilanti. Colored boys aged about 17 and 20 years. Sentenced to Ionia for two years each.

Ann Arbor Courier

March 30 1888

Steward Downey, a colored, man and ex-slave, died in Ypsilanti March 16, aged 90 years.

Ann Arbor Argus

May 11 1888

The Ypsilanti colored people give a leap year dance at Light Guard Hall next Thursday evening.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 22 1888

Walter Griffïn, an Ypsilanti colored lad of eighteen, is languishing in jail for attempting to enter a cigar store early in the morning by way of a window.

Walter Stafford, a colored lad, was sentenced to lonia last Monday for one year, for attempting to break into the store of Joseph H. Manning, in Ypsilanti, on Sunday morning, June 10. He is said to have been in lonia before.

Ann Arbor Argus

August 8 1888

Alfred E. Thomas, one of the most esteemed colored men of this county, died at his residence in Ann Arbor last Saturday morning, aged 52. Mr. Thomas was born a slave, but gained his freedom and came to this city upwards of 35 years ago. He was an old soldier, being a member of Co. I 102 Colored Infantry, which was Michigan’s colored regiment. He was wounded at Deveaux Neck, N. C. Mr. Thomas was a prominent member of the A.M.E. Church of this city with which he was united 11 years since. He was also an active member of St. Mary’s lodge F. & A. M., under whose auspices he was buried, Monday afternoon, there being about 30 of his brothers in line, including some from Ypsilanti. Rev. Mr. Jeffries, of Ypsilanti, preached the sermon, and the funeral was probably the largest colored funeral ever held in the county. He leaves a wife and two children.”

Ann Arbor Courier

August 15 1888

Rev. G. B. Pope, of this city assisted in conducting a basket camp meeting at Chatham, Ont., last Sunday, many of our colored brethren attending the same.

Ann Arbor Courier

August 18 1888

“The Colored Evangelistic Association propose to hold a Camp meeting in Hemphill’s Grove from Aug. 17 to 26.”

“Rev. R. Jeffries, pastor of the A. M. E. Church, presiding elder of the first district of Michigan, wishes to day that he is in no way connected with the Camp Meeting advertised to begin in R. W. Hemphills grove to-day, and he warns all his people against attending or patronizing it, in any way, as in his opinion its leaders are first-class frauds.”

Argus

August 31 1888

“Rev. T. H. Hector, the well known colored orator, will speak at the Opera House here to-morrow night, from a Prohibition standpoint.”

Ann Arbor Argus

September 13 1888

Archie Foster, the colored boy who graduated at the Normal last year, goes this week to take the Principalship of a School at Hope, Arkansas. A promising young man.

September 14 1888

James Ambrose, a colored Ypsilanti barber, had the misfortune to lose his house and goods two weeks ago to-day by a fire which injured him$500 worth.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 20 1888

Mr. Miller, the new Pastor of the African M.E. Church is a full blooded Mohawk Indian with an African wife.

Commercial

September 21 1888

George Hopkins, a colored man of Ypsilanti, had his barn burned recently, the work of an incendiary.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 26, 1888. Courier

September 26, 1888. Courier

December 5 1888

Nelson Smith, a colored lad about 24 years of age, who had been employed as a porter in and about different places in the city, stole a ride on a freight train from Ypsilanti last Thursday, and in attempting to jump off at this station was so badly injured that death ensued on Sunday.

Ann Arbor Courier

December 7, 1881. Argus.

December 7, 1881. Argus.

January 13 1891

Jonathan Bibbs, of near Ypsilanti, lost his house by fire Thursday night. This is the fourth fire that Mr. Bibbs, who is a colored man, has had in fifteen years.

Ann Arbor Argus

May 15 1891

Rev. R. H. Felton; pastor of the Ypsilanti A. M. E. church, died Wednesday night, of heart disease.

The Ypsilanti colored men have organized an Odd Fellows lodge.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 18 1891

There are twenty-five less colored children of school age in Ypsilanti this year than last.

Ann Arbor Argus

October 9 1891

George Harris, a young colored man from Ypsilanti, dropped into the county clerk’s office, Tuesday afternoon, and took out a marriage license He was accompanied by the brideelect, Mary Washington, and as they were about to leave with the license it was suggested that there was no necessity of their waiting until they arrived in Ypsilanti before having the ceremony performed, as Justice Bogardus, also from Ypsilanti, was on hand and anxious for a job. The couple jumped at the chance, and before they were hardly aware of what was going on, the justice had pronounced them man and wife, the justice making the couple a wedding present of his legal fees.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 3 1892

The colored citizens of Ypsilanti last week waxed warm over the shooting of Griffin by Officer Eaton and made all sorts of threats. They called upon Mayor Glover to take some action in the matter, but the mayor informed them that the officer had only done his duty.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 10 1892

Mrs. Martha Jane Hunt, of Ypsilanti, has filed a bill for divorce from Josiah Hunt on the ground of desertion for four years. Both parties are colored and they have two daughters, just of age.

Death extinguished the family of Lewis Cunningham, colored, of Ypsilanti, last week. First his only child died. A week later, or last Saturday. his wife died. In the afternoon of that day he was taken with an epileptic fit and expired.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 1 1892

The colored people of Ypsilanti seem bound to stand up for Jake Griffin, the brutal wretch who was confessedly guilty of several criminal assaults in Ypsilanti and was shot in the leg while fleeing from arrest by Officer Eaton, who was in pursuit. They have now banded together to prosecute Eaton, as the following from the South Lyon Picket would indicate: Officer Eaton, the erstwhile policeman who shot Jacob Griffin, will now be brought before the people on a grave charge. Last evening Rev. J. L. Davis, of Ypsilanti, who is the recognized leader of the colored people in that locality, was in town, and before Squire Calkins, swore out a warrant for the above named Eaton, the charges in substance being “an assault to do great bodily harm less than the crime of murder.” It will appear from the above that the colored citizens of Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti have been investigating the affair and as predicted by the Picket, will make it decidedly interesting for Eaton. He will be brought here in a day or two, when the trial will occur. In all probability, D. Augustus Straker, the famous colored attorney of Detroit, will appear for the prosecution. At all events the trial will be conducted in South Lyon and it is to be hoped that if Eaton is guilty, he will receive his just punishment. Last evening a deputy sheriff from South Lyon was here with the warrant and went to Ypsilanti for the purpose of arresting Eaton.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 22 1892

John Taylor, an Ypsilanti colored lad, on the 4th, blew into a toy cannon, to discover why it did not go off. As it “went” a moment later and plowed a four-inch furrow in his skull.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 2 1892

Ypsilanti has a colored Democratic club with thirty-five members.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 16 1892

The colored Democrats in Ypsilanti will hold a mass meeting this evening and make a street parade.

Ann Arbor Agus

October 7 1892

The population of Ypsilanti is increasing at a rapid rate. Mrs. J. Scott, colored, became the mother of three babies, last Tuesday night – two girls and a boy.

Ypsilantian

January 6 1893

Ypsilanti colored aristocracy has organized a minstrel troup and will display the advantages they have received from their high social position, at an exhibition next Monday evening.

Ann Arbor Argus

February 17 1893

Wood, a colored cook in the Occidental House, Ypsilanti, was fined $18 by Justice Beach, Friday, for purloining provisions.

Ann Arbor Argus

March 10 1893

Ben Collins, the colored porter of the Hawkins house, Ypsilanti, is serving sixty-five days in the Detroit House of Correction for stealing $8 from an overcoat.

Ann Arbor Argus

April 14 1893

Percival Murphy, one of the oldest colored residents of Ypsilanti, died last Thursday evening.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 27, 1893. Argus.

July 27, 1893. Argus.

August 11 1893

George Washington, of Ypsilanti, colored, died last week in a lonely house, unwept, unattended and without any known relative.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 1 1893

Chas. Thomas and Geo. Hopkins, colored, of Ypsilanti, being arrested for stealing a sack of flour, were defended with so much vigor, by J. P. Kirk and E. P. Allen, that the jury acquitted and disagreed as to the other – the prisoners, not the counsel. How does this policy of trying to free wool, accord with Capt. Allen’s campaign speeches?

Ann Arbor Argus

September 15 1893

The Ypsilanti school census shows a falling off in school population in that city. In 1891 the school population was 1,773, in 1892 it was 1,684, and in 1873 it is 1,607, a falling off of 166 in two years. The falling off of the white school population is 106 and of the colored 60. The colored school population now numbers 131.

Simon Preston was divorced from Dora Preston. This is another Ypsilanti case, the parties being colored. They were married in the A. M. E. church in Ypsilanti, December 23, 1890. Simon accused Dora of extreme cruelty, consisting in preferring the society of other men, whom she met out of the house.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 22 1893

John Edward Parker, an Ypsilanti colored lad, has been sent to the Reform School for one year.

Ann Arbor Argus

January 19 1894

Two officers from Chatham, Ontario, arrived in the city last evening. They are here to identify the two colored men who endeavored to dispose of a stolen horse in Chatham.

Ann Arbor Argus

February 9 1894

The Ypsilanti colored minstrels, under the new role of “The Twin Island Social Club,” will give another performance at Benevolent hall Thursday evening.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 19 1894

A colored lodge of Knights of Pythias is projected at Ypsilanti, and as a starter the financial sinews of the enterprise may be braced with the net receipts of a female minstrel show The plan is under consideration. It is expected that Dr. Ryan will receive a complimentary ticket.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 22 1894

As soon as it was known in Ypsilanti that John Harris, the colored man was around on the street Wednesday with the smallpox, he was treated with that deferential respect that would belong to an African prince. He was given the same liberal right of way that was accorded to Titusville porker who ate up a can of nitroglycerine. No one dared kick the hog for fear of the result.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 17 1894

Colored K. of P. of Ypsilanti will give a picnic Thursday, on the fair grounds, and a fat woman’s race will constitute one feature if not others.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 24 1894

The colored boys of Ypsilanti have organized a base ball club. Concerning this, we have nothing to say, – it is one of the constitutional privileges conferred on the Afro-American race by the amendments. But when they meet an Ann Arbor club and “whap the whey” out of them, as they did the other day, the Argus objects, it ‘just ain’t constitutional.’

Ann Arbor Argus

July 31 1894

Rev. Mr. Brown, pastor of the colored Baptist church of Ypsilanti, has relinquished his job. At this season of the year it requires a strong ministerial arm to keep the colored Ypsilantian from failing away from theology and devoting most of his talent to a structural analysis of the watermelon. Rev. Wm. Johnson, however, who is accredited with remarkable disciplinary ability, is said to be able to do that thing, and has assumed the pastorate.

Ann Arbor Argus

August 7 1894

Some colored people of Ypsilanti, who attended the Emancipation day celebration at Windsor, and made a half hair mistake on the returning of the train, and either paid another fare or walked in, are indignant and think the road ought to be abolished.

Ann Arbor Argus

August 14 1894

The state grand lodge of colored Odd Fellows will be held in Ypsilanti next year. It will be black men’s day at Ypsilanti.

John Brown Post, of Detroit, sends $2 to the ladies’ soldiers monument fund at Ypsilanti. The soul of Old John keeps on the move.

Ann Arbor Argus

December 28 1894

The colored K. of P. of Ypsilanti gave a masked ball, Christmas night, which was participated in by about 40 couples, with a large spectatorial attendance. Mr. Williams masqueraded so well as a Dutchman that everybody, even the judges, mistook him for one and he narrowly escaped missing the prize. Miss Allie De Hazen captured the ladies’ prize, by wearing a dress that disguised her as an old auntie.

Ann Arbor Argus

March 8 1895

Mrs. Anna De Hazen died in Ypsilanti Wednesday, aged 45 years.

Ann Arbor Argus

April 16 1895

Thomas J. Davis, who died last Thursday in Ypsilanti, was a member of the United States colored troops in the late war

Ann Arbor Argus

August 2 1895

The colored Odd Fellows celebrate in Ypsilanti next Tuesday and Wednesday.

Ann Arbor Argus

May 8 1896

A severe electric storm occurred in the vicinity of Ypsilanti Monday. On the farm of Mrs. Martha Chaplin, of Ypsilanti town, where the lightning struck, a colored man named LaFayette Crosby was plowing with a team at the time and the shock killed one horse, stunned the other and came near paralyzing Crosby. He was unconscious for some time.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 12 1896

George Hayes, a colored lad, aged 10 years, was run over by a street sprinkler driven by Frank Haynes, at Ypsilanti, on Friday last. The loam attached to the wagon ran away, as it had done several times before, and the wagon weighing 3,300 pounds passed over the lower part of the boy’s abdomen, inflicting internal injuries, which resulted fatally. The Business Men’s Association of Ypsilanti promptly notified Mr. Haynes that he would not be allowed to drive the team any longer on the wagon and other horses wore put on to it. Hayes died Monday afternoon, general peritonitis having set in.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 19 1896

A camp meeting of the colored people of Ypsilanti and vicinity is in progress at Milan. It convened yesterday and will last until Monday.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 3 1896

A dance that was being held by the colored people of Ypsilanti, Thursday night of last week, was rudely broken up by an Ann Arbor man who thought his Ypsilanti brothers were monopolizing his lady too much. He drew his razor and started in to clean out the hall. The way in which the crowd got out clearly evidenced the powerful argument of his knife.

Ann Arbor Argus

August 28 1896

The next annual meeting of the grand lodge colored Knights of Pythias will be held in Ypsilanti, June 15-17, 1897.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 4 1896

Louis Charlton, colored, died in Ypsilanti, Tuesday morning, aged about 80 years. He had been ailing for four or five years.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 18 1896

While the Ypsilanti colored Oddfellows were celebrating on Thursday evening of last week at Benevolent hall in that city, a disturbance was raised in which Charles Fox, of this city, took a hand. He paid 5.05 to Justice Childs, of Ypsilanti, on Friday for the “fun” he had had.

Ann Arbor Argus

October 9 1896

Mrs. Jeremiah Patten (colored), of Ypsilanti, died at home at Harriet St., Tuesday night at 1 o’clock.

Ann Arbor Argus

November 6 1896

Miss Genevieve Thompson, a highly respected young colored woman, of Ypsilanti, died of consumption at her home in that city Tuesday morning.

Ann Arbor Argus

November 20 1896

Robert C. Ross, a very wealthy colored man living at 734 Prospect St., Ypsilanti, died Friday, aged 75 years, having been ill during the past 12 months. He leaves a wife, but no children. The deceased was born in slavery in Virginia, but after the war took to speculating in the south and succeeded in amassing a considerable fortune. He posse6sed at the time of his death a valuable 600 acre farm in Canada and bas a large amount of money out at interest. But a short time ago be stopped into one of the stores and figured up a draft be had received from a Canadian bank, which was the interest on a single deposit of $20,000. The deceased has lived in Ypsilanti about five years.

Ann Arbor Argus

November 27 1896

George Brown, colored, of Ypsilanti, was arrested Saturday, charged with being the father of his step-daughter’s child, born Sept. 6, she being oily 14 years old last March. The complaint was made by the girl’s father, William Washington, from whom her mother was divorced, afterwards marrying Brown.

Ann Arbor Argus

January 1 1897

The Afro-American convention held at the court house Saturday afternoon did not pan out exactly as those who planned it expected. The idea of the convention emanated from Ann Arbor and the idea was that M. W. Guy, of this city, should be the selection of the convention for a candidate for a clerkship in the auditor general’s office at Lansing. But “the best laid plans of mice and men gang oft agree” and when the ballots were counted it was found that Frank Johnson, of Ypsilanti, carried the long pole that knocked off the persimmon and that he was the candidate for the office by a vote of 18 to 12. Rev. J. D. Barksdale, of Ypsilanti, was chosen chairman of the meeting, and Jas. Kersey, also of Ypsilanti, was chosen secretary, it was plainly an Ypsilanti meeting and Ann Arbor was not in it. It was a hot and stormy meeting and a great deal of anything but harmonious feeling was engendered. The following item taken from the Ypsilanti page of the Washtenaw Evening Times of Dec. 28, may throw some light on the unlooked for action of the convention : “Although the colored citizens in their caucus in Good Samaritan hall last Tuesday night had, in a semi-official way, resolved to support M. W. Guy, of Ann Arbor, for that position in the auditor general’s office at Lansing, the entire action was overturned at the dance in Light Guard hall Friday evening as easily as a buckwheat cake on a griddle. A number were down from Ann Arbor and gave intimation to Frank Johnson, of this city, that he would receive a generous support if he would enter the race. Mr. Johnson’s friends in the delegation to the convention at Aon Arbor rallied about him, and the result of the conference at Ann Arbor on Saturday was that Mr. Johnson was selected as the representative of the colored people of this county for the position at Lansing and his claims will be pushed with zeal. Mr. Johnson is a young man, a graduate of the Pontiac high school, of extraordinary intelligence and clerical ability, a leading church member and superintendent of the Sunday school, and if the new auditor general sees fit to appoint him, will make a capable assistant in the office at Lansing.”

Ann Arbor Argus

January 15 1897

Francis J. Johnson, of Ypsilanti, who was endorsed by the colored people of Washtenaw County for the position of assistant in the cloak room at the capitol in Lansing, has received that appointment.

Ann Arbor Argus

March 26, 1897

Two colored citizens of Ypsilanti, both of whom were soldiers in the late war, and both named Jeremiah, died within half an hour of each other Thursday of last week. They were Jeremiah Snively, who died of pneumonia, and Jeremiah Patton, who succumbed to a stroke of paralysis. The funeral services of the two old veterans were held simultaneously on Sunday afternoon at the A. M. E. church, Ypsilanti, and were Conducted by the ministers of both the A. M. E. and Baptist Churches in that city and Ann Arbor. The G. A. R. turned out in a body and the colored Masons attended in honor of their deceased brother, Jeremiah Snively. The coffins were placed beside each other and it took the crowd 15 minutes to pass by and view the remains. The procession to the cemetery reached farther than from River St. to Huron St., Ypsilanti.

An old colored man named Evans died at his rooms in the McAndew block, Ypsilanti, Sunday, of old age, being over 70 years of age.

Ann Arbor Argus

April 2 1897

Charles Brown, aged 16, colored, died of typhoid fever in Ypsilanti.

Ann Arbor Argus

April 9 1897

In the second district, which is conceded to be a democratic stronghold Anthony Ryan was beaten by Sumner Damon and Ypsilanti has now two republican supervisors. The first ward is usually republican but the colored voters threw their strength to Clifford Hueston, democrat, and he was elected.

Ann Arbor Argus

April 16, 1897

Mrs. Emily Cunningham, colored, died at her home in Ypsilanti, Wednesday of last week, aged 74 years.

Ann Arbor Argus

April 30 1897

Sixteen converts to the colored Baptist church in Ypsilanti were immersed in the Huron liver near the waterworks by Rev. Mr. Carrol on Sunday afternoon in the presence of about 250 people.

Two colored porters at one of the Ypsilanti hotels got into a jangle between themselves Wednesday of last week, and it resulted in their being discharged. Later in the day they again met and renewed the quarrel, finally adjourning to the fair ground to fight it out. After pounding each other for three-quarters of an hour they became short of wind and decided to postpone the finish of the event. The same evening they were restored to their former positions upon a promise not to do so again.

Ann Arbor Argus

June 18 1897

Jas. Crosby, colored, died at his home in Ypsilanti, Thursday night of last week, aged 26 years, of consumption.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 16 1897

The Ypsilanti colored people hold a basket meeting next Sunday in the grove near the paper mill under the auspices of the Second Baptist church.

Ann Arbor Argus

August 6 1897

F. J. Johnson, of Ypsilanti, was elected deputy district grand master of the Michigan United Order of Oddfellows (colored) at the fifth annual session held in Flint Tuesday. The order has a membership in Michigan of 850 and is in a prosperous condition according to the reports

Ann Arbor Argus

August 6 1897

Colored Knights of Pythias of the Eastern and Western Hemisphere, held in Ypsilanti, Tuesday, the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Grand chancellor, H. P. Tolliver, of Detroit; grand vice chancellor, Al De Hazen, of Ypsilanti; grand master at arms, Joseph Pierce, of Ann Arbor; grand prelate, J Rev. H. P. Thomas, of Ann Arbor; grand outer guard, Charles Williams, of Ypsilanti. The meeting of the grand lodge next year will be held in Ann Arbor.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 3 1897

The A. M. E. conference has ceased its labors at Flint and several changes have been made in the pastors of the colored Methodist churches in this county. Rev. William Collins, who has been in Ann Arbor for some time, is given the pastorate of the Lansing church and Rev. Sandy Simmons comes to this city. Rev. J. E. Alexander is made pastor of the Ypsilanti for the coming year and Rev. O. F. Hill of the Whittaker church Rev. W. H. Butler, of Detroit, has been re-appointed as presiding eider. Rev. William Collins was elected secretary of the Missionary Society.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 10 1897

The total number of children of school age in Ypsilanti this year is 1,772, an even hundred more than attended last year. Of this number 1,609 are white and 163 colored.

Ann Arbor Argus

December 12, 1897. Argus

December 12, 1897. Argus

March 11 1898

Arthur Jones, a colored drayman of Ypsilanti, was draying a pile of boxes on his dray the other day when the load toppled over carrying him with it. He was badly shaken up, but no boxes were broken.

Ann Arbor Argus

May 27, 1898. Argus.

May 27, 1898. Argus.

June 10 1898

The colored people of Ypsilanti expect to have a celebration Aug. 1.

Ann Arbor Argus

July 29 1898

The state board of pardons has denied the application for pardon of Thomas Jones, who was sent up from this county for 20 years on the charge of assault with intent to kill in March, 1894. He will be remembered as the colored man who was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Peterson in Ypsilanti after an exciting chase in which Peterson received bullet wound in his hand.

Ann Arbor Argus

August 12 1898

John Boatman, of Ypsilanti, is serving 10 days in jail for throwing a stone at a colored man which broke a window. His father had just preceded him by a few days on the charge of drunkenness.

Ann Arbor Argus

September 16 1898

Ypsilanti has 1778 children of school age of which 155 are colored, a gain of three colored children and 10 white over last year.

Ann Arbor Argus

November 4 1898

A concert tinder the direction of Miss Chalmers and Mrs. Sherman will be given in the A. M. E. church, corner of Buffalo and Adams St., Ypsilanti, Friday evening, Nov. 11, at 7:45 o’clock. Proceeds to go toward paying church mortgage. Admission 10 cents.

Ann Arbor Argus

December 16, 1898

The marriage license which Jonathan McGee, the 110 year old colored citizen, of Ypsilanti, wanted last Saturday, was issued today. Our readers will remember that Mr. McGee did not know the name of his intended bride, and so couldn’t get the license. The bride’s name turned out to be Mrs. Amelia Day, who was born in Oswego N. Y., 50 years ago and who has been once married. McGee is described as born in Alabama, 110 years ago, a boiler maker by trade, who has been three times previously married. Jerome Schermerhorn made the affidavit which: secured the license. It will be seen that McGee was 60 years old when his bride was born. It will be remembered that he claimed to have been a servant of Washington. Among the noted men he claims to have seen was Joseph Bonaparte, the brother of the great Napoleon, at the time he visited Mexico.

Ann Arbor Argus-Democrat

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